Gah!

The Elizabeth Township Sanitary Authority, which illegally has allowed millions of gallons of raw sewage to flow into the lower Youghiogheny River during the past five months, has been ordered to reduce and eventually stop the overflows.

The authority also must submit to the Health Department by March 20 a plan and schedule for the complete elimination of the sewage overflows, which continue to occur on a daily basis.

Eventually stop? EVENTUALLY STOP!?!?

That’s like me saying, “Hey, you pigeon currently pecking my eyeball out? Yeah, would you please eventually stop doing that? In fact, if you could just reduce your pecking to maybe five pecks per second, that would be grand. And then maybe after you’ve chewed my ears off and shit upon my forehead … maybe then you’ll consider submitting a three-page type-written plan about how you plan to stop? I’d be much obliged. Ow.”

This is why I could never have a job in the public sector because if I’m in a position of power and someone tells me that the Elizabeth Township Sanitary Authority has been pumping raw sewage into the Yough for months and does not currently have the capacity to stop doing it and how do I want to deal with that literal shit?

Nuke the plant.

Me love killing, grr.





9 Comments

  1. curtO.
    January 25, 2008 11:57 am

    PittGirl, feeling violent today? Go kick a pigeon on your lunchbreak, that should help.

    cO.



  2. Sarah
    January 25, 2008 12:11 pm

    I’d be violent too. Thats disgusting.



  3. Me
    January 25, 2008 12:17 pm

    I think every post should now end with that tag line.



  4. Pingback: Authority » Gah!

  5. KY Woman
    January 25, 2008 12:24 pm

    I’m with you on this one PG. No one in the current generation of “community leaders” seems capable of rational thought on issues affecting the greater community. Rather than come together and make a reasoned decision quickly to correct a problem, they feel safer just letting everyone know they are “getting ready to start to begin to set up a meeting where they will set dates to hold discussions on ways of approaching the problem without offending anyone who may be unintentionally profiting from the problem…” Maybe the state needs to set up community leadership training programs across the commonwealth to encourage younger, stronger minds to get involved in community leadership, development and management. I’m not one of those younger minds, but hey, WTF we got to lose?



  6. Ed Heath
    January 25, 2008 1:51 pm

    I glanced at that article at lunch. The plant is run by a French firm (Veolia Water North America Operating Services) that claims it the plant is treating less than a million gallons of waste a day, even while overflows occurred every day since November 22. The maximum capacity of the plant is 2.3 million gallons of waste, with an average capacity of 1.4 millon gallons. The article is an interesting read: (http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/08025/852084-55.stm). Reading bewtween the lines, ACHD says the plant must now be staffed 24 hours a day, check and maintain its equipment and run it manually instead of automatically. It sounds like the Frech company bid low and is now trying to save money by having no overnight staff and minimal day staff. The article says right now there is just an order to fix the problem, but the health department says fines are coming.



  7. fugly
    January 25, 2008 2:24 pm

    To KY Woman

    There are a few organizations out there that are trying to educate community leaders, officials and citizens. One that comes to mind is LGA, or Local Government Academy.

    http://www.localgovernmentacademy.org/



  8. Pingback: Department Of Health » Gah

  9. Steve S
    January 25, 2008 3:54 pm

    Anyone know what is so special about 28 Liters/sec?

    This is the flow rate of water required to dilute industrial and municipal waste to acceptable cleanliness levels for 1000 people.

    Now I don’t know what the flow rate of the Yough is or the number of people that this plant services…but back in the day (and in many parts of our current world) This is what they would use for sustainable city planning and disease control.

    Not that approve of this practice, but I am not that concerned about it either.